Chat with us, powered by LiveChat

3D Printer Review: Battle of Continuous Fiber Composites

3D printer review battle of the composite 3D printers Anisoprint Markforged continuous carbon fiber

3D Printer Review: Battle of Continuous Fiber Composites

With so many choices for 3D printers on the market, few can deliver strength-to-weight ratios like continuous fiber 3D printers.

Using FDM Fused Deposition Modeling (aka FFF) technology, these 3D printers lay continuous fibers into the base filament of the 3D printed part to produce strong lightweight parts that rival metal.

There is a couple of competitors in the market and Anisoprint with over 10 years of composite manufacturing experience offering a clear alternative to the rest.

The name Anisoprint is derived from anisotropy, to exhibit different parameters of stiffness and strength in different directions (e.g. horizontal and vertical).

Understanding the differences between Anisoprint and their main competitors can be confusing, however, understanding how traditional composite fiber parts are manufactured gives you insight into how these manufacturing processes were adapted to 3D printing technology.

Anisoprint Markforged composite 3D printer review

Composite Manufacturing

Without getting too technical, producing composite parts is laying in fiber, such as carbon fiber, into polymer matrix layer by layer and laminating them together: and it is the way these 3D Printers laminate that is the most distinguishing characteristic between them.

The type of fiber and the volume of fiber in a composite can vary, for instance, when manufacturing aerospace composites the amount is as high as 60%.

composite manufacturing Anisoprint Markforged 3D printer review

3D Printer Fiber Extrusion Methods

Both Anisoprint and the competition use a dual extrusion technique where there is a base filament and continuous fiber, the latter can be customized in the slicing software.

The way the competitor system extrudes the fiber is a prepreg placement technique: heating a roll of filament fiber which has about 28% fiber and the remaining being a thermoplastic and by heating the filament as it extrudes, it bonds to the base thermoplastic filament, usually a Nylon or Nylon mixed with short fibers of carbon fiber and limited colour choices.

 

Anisoprint use a unique co-extrusion technique, where prepreg (fiber impregnated with thermoset) and thermoplastic matrix and fed into the extruder simultaneously. The extruder heats them, making the matrix soft and elastic and the fiber sticky and less rigid, then the blend is extruded as one single composite material.

Its this patented co-extrusion technique using preimpregnated (with thermoset) fiber that gives it the ability to bond to a wide range of thermoplastics.

Composite Co-Extrusion

Anisoprint composite co-extrusion
Anisoprint composite co-extrusion
Anisoprint Diagram
Anisoprint Diagram

The benefit of using Anisoprint co-extrusion is adaptive 3D printing: where the volume ratio change or amount of matrix and fiber can be modified, if required.

Anisoprint co-extrusion allows 3D printer users to create parts with fiber volumes up to 60% (which meets the demands of aerospace production), 3D print internal lattice structures with continuous fiber (not just base filament), make use of adaptive layer thickness, and make many other flexible choices to lay continuous fiber.

Using prepreg plus thermoplastic instead of dry fiber plus thermoplastic creates an open system, giving the user the ability to print with any type of base filament or colour within the specifications of the printer, such as PLA, Nylon, TPU, ABS, Pet-G, or composites such as a thermoplastic with short fibers to provide characteristics for specific applications and conditions, such as high or low temperature, friction, UV, chemical resistance, anti-microbial/bacterial or flame retardant.

Materials

polymaker polylite pla filament sample 4718 1 p Moving at the Speed of Business

Many other continuous fiber 3D printer manufacturers offer only a limited range of their proprietary materials which can be limited to the application and colour selection. While Anisoprint have their own materials as well, they offer an open system, so users have a wide range for choice when it comes to material applications such as Nylon, PLA, PET-G, Polycarbonate, PC-FR, TPU, etc. and of course any colour choice that the filament comes in, so you can print in the right material for the right application.

Aura Slicing Software

Aura slicing software allows the user to use the flexibility of anisoprinting technology to the fullest. With a wide range of adjustable parameters that are unique in the market, Aura can fully control the process of printing to meet all customer demands. For those who wish to simply choose a material and print, there is a number of preset optimized plug and play profiles for various materials that can produce an excellent finished part with no manual input or parameter adjustment.

Anisoprint aura masks
Anisoprint Aura - Masking

Masking

A mask is an additional model that is added to the work area to intersect with the base model, changing the model’s internal structure in the intersection volume.

This type of marking intersection serves for adjusting fiber and support parameters that are different from those selected for the rest of the model.

You can see the base model (grey) and the mask model (orange) in the picture below. The base part volume inside the mask will be printed with special settings for the mask.

Layer Thickness

Aura software allows users to adapt layer thickness, for instance, a user may want a nice surface finish and 3D print a layer of 50um around the surfaces and on the inside 3D print 200um or higher where surface finish is not an issue, this hack increases the speed of the print.

Fiber Directions

Competitors’ slicing software has the option for linear or concentric printing of continuous fibers.

Anisoprint Aura software gives the user the option for a combination of:

  • Linear
  • Concentric (with an option to choose separately, concentric fibers for inner and outer perimeters)
  • Curvilinear trajectories
  • Lattices

These combinations provide users with the flexibility to lay fibers in the right directions giving maximum strength and directional force.

Lattices

The ability to 3D print various lattice structures with continuous fiber gives parts strength in the right places, speed to print and lighter parts, providing load distribution along the 1D ribs, making the part 2-3x stronger compared to the one with plastic lattices. Compared to printing on a competitor’s machine that cannot print continuous fiber lattices such part will also be lighter.

Anisoprint provides users with flexible options for lattice patterns:

  • Solid
  • Rhombic
  • Isogrid
  • anisogrid

Fiber printing (Microns)

Aura allows 3D printing of continuous fibers of up to 350um whereas the competing 3D printing systems only 3D print up to 200um.

Desktop Composite Continuous Fiber 3D Printers

Using stepper motors, the desktop range from Anisoprint provide large print volumes:

  • Anisoprint Composer A4: 297x210x140mm
  • Anisoprint Composer A3: 460x297x210mm

Industrial Continuous Fiber Composite 3D Printers

When it comes to industrial application, Anisoprint has a true industrial printer with industrial level components, designed for 24/7 production to print 60cc p/hr of continuous carbon fiber with a max travel speed of 20,000 mm per minute:

  • PLC Based BOSCH Rexroth XM42 controller
  • Servo motors with brakes
  • Industrial automation
  • Safety and sensors
  • Liquid cooling
  • 400 degrees max. extruder temp to 3D print thermoplastics such as PEEK and PEI
  • 160-degree heated chamber
  • Build volume: 600x420x300mm
  • Tool changer for 4 extruders
  • Material dryer
  • Server-based software

Competitive Comparison Matrix - Continuous Fiber 3D Printers

Anisoprint Desktop Composer

Competitor Desktop

Build Volume

A4: 297x210x140mm - 25% larger build volume than competitor

A3: 460x297x210mm - 77% larger build volume than competitor

320x132x154mm

Base Filaments (Matrix)

Open material system

Yes

No

Continuous Fibers

Continuous carbon fiber 

Yes

Yes

Continuous basalt fiber 

Yes

No

Continuous aramid fiber

No

Yes

Continuous fibreglass fiber

No

Yes

Variable Fiber to Volume Ratio

Yes

No

Fiber to volume Ratio

Up to 60%

28%

Layer Resolution

Resolution (microns)

36 to 360

100 to 200

Adaptive Layer Resolution

Yes

No

Continuous Fiber Directions

Linear Trajectories

Yes

Yes

Concentric Trajectories

Yes

Yes

Rhombic Lattice Structures

Yes

No

Isogrid Lattice Structures

Yes

No

Anisogrid Lattice Structures

Yes

No

Curvlinear Trajectories

Yes

No

Combination of Trajectories 

Yes

No

Combination of Linear, Curvlinear, and Concentric Trajectories

Yes

No

Combination of Trajectories and Lattices

Yes

No

Slicing Software

Masks

Yes

No

Support Blockers

Yes

No

Support Enforcer

Yes

No

Headless Mode (CLI)

Yes

No

Export G-Code

Yes

No

Anisoprint Industrial Prom IS 500

Competitor Industrial

Build Volume

600x420x300 - 78% larger build volume than competitor

330x270x200mm

Servo Motors

Yes

No

Tool Changer

Yes

No

Base Filament Extruders

4

1

Liquid Cooled Extruder

Yes

No

Max temperature of 400 degrees

Yes

No

Heated Build Chamber

Yes

No

Material Dryer

Yes

No

Safety Sensors

Yes

No

Laser Scanning

No

Yes

Base Filaments (Matrix)

Open material system

Yes

No

Continuous Fibers

Continuous carbon fiber 

Yes

Yes

Continuous basalt fiber 

Yes

No

Continuous kevlar fiber

No

Yes

Continuous fibreglass fiber

No

Yes

Variable Fiber to Volume Ratio

Yes

No

Fiber to volume Ratio

Up to 60%

28%

Layer Resolution

Resolution (microns)

60 to 350

50 to 200

Adaptive Layer Resolution

Yes

No

Continuous Fiber Directions

Linear Trajectories

Yes

Yes

Concentric Trajectories

Yes

Yes

Rhombic Lattice Structures

Yes

No

Isogrid Lattice Structures

Yes

No

Anisogrid Lattice Structures

Yes

No

Curvlinear Trajectories

Yes

No

Combination of Trajectories 

Yes

No

Combination of Linear, Curvlinear, and Concentric Trajectories

Yes

No

Combination of Trajectories and Lattices

Yes

No

Slicing Software

Masks

Yes

No

Support Blockers

Yes

No

Support Enforcer

Yes

No

Headless Mode (CLI)

Yes

No

Export G-Code

Yes

No

Conclusion

While on the surface, composite 3D printers seem to be the same and do similar functions, when you look at the extrusion hardware and slicing software in the desktop range and the motors and other components in  the industrial range, differences are quite contrast.

If you are looking for greater continuous fiber choices, then Anisoprint may not be the right fit, however, the fact that it can use any base plastic, whether it be rigid or flexible, offers greater choice and eliminates the need for a wider range of continuous fiber.

The Anisoprinting system gives the user basic settings like the competition to simply print and go, or for advanced use, the freedom and the ability to manipulate the direction of fibers, lattice structures to produce lighter parts and the choice in the right base filament to fit the desired application with a bigger build volume to print larger parts.

In the industrial range, the Prom is a true industrial size and built for 24×7 use with 4x tool changers and servi motors, while the alternative is small and doesn’t use the same industrial components but compensates with a laser scanning tool.

All composite 3D printers with continuous fiber will give you strong, lightweight parts that rival replacing metal, it’s just that the Anisoprint has the hardware and software to be to steer the continuous fibers with greater flexibility, which caters to the benefits of composite fiber manufacturing. 

 

Contact Us

If you would learn more about Anisoprint, please contact us by calling on 1800 490 514, by filling out the form or clicking the live chat in the bottom right-hand corner.

Contact Us Moving at the Speed of Business

VIEW MORE

What is Fiber Steering? 3D Anisoprinting with Continuous Fibers

Anisoprint fiber steering 4 Moving at the Speed of Business

What is Fiber Steering? 3D Anisoprinting with Continuous Fibers

Continuous Fiber 3D Printers are great but what’s the point of 3D printing long fibers if you can’t control the direction of the fibers in the way you need them to be?

It’s a bit like having a car with a that can only drive straight.

Fiber Steering Composites - Controlling Fiber Trajectories

Fiber steering is the ability to control the trajectories of fiber reinforcement.

It is one of the biggest advantages of continuous fiber 3D printing technology. This allows you to produce optimal composites for a given load without increasing the weight, wich impossible with conventional composite manufacturing technologies such as composite layup or winding.

Anisoprint fiber steering 1 Moving at the Speed of Business

FFiber Steering Composites - Reinforcement Where You Need It

For example, you can effectively reinforce the parts with holes. It’s well known that holes are stress concentrators that significantly reduce the strength of structural elements. The main goal was to find a method for rational reinforcement of such parts.

Anisoprint fiber steering 2 Moving at the Speed of Business

The sample was reinforced with curved paths corresponding to the load distribution, without increasing the weight. Traditionally, to increase the strength of an element, a part thickness is increased that leads to an increase of the part weight.

As a result of a specific layup of the reinforcing fiber in the sample, the stress concentrations are removed from the holes and the load evenly distributed over the entire part.

Anisoprint fiber steering 3 Moving at the Speed of Business

Fiber Steering Comppsites - Applications

Fiber steering has been the subject of intense study. In the article “Manufacturing and Testing of A Fibre Steered Panel with A Large Cut-out, Composite Structures (2017)” described an experiment that showed that fiber steering is effective for a panel that is the lower wing skin with a large hole.

Anisoprint fiber steering 4 Moving at the Speed of Business

Three panels, one for each type of laminate, are built from thermoset prepreg material using automated fiber placement. One of the panels was made by fiber steering, the other two were with straight fibers: one with quasi-isotropic and the second with constant stiffness.

All panels are tested in pure tension. The failure loads, failure modes, and weights of the tested panels are compared. The results indicate that the variable stiffness laminate (fiber steering) is capable of sustaining loads of up to 2 times, before failure, then the constant stiffness and quasi-isotropic laminates of equal weight.

Design Consulting supplies the complete range of Anisoprint continuous fiber desktop and industrial 3D printer range that provides an open system to print in virtually any plastic material and re-inforce the 3D print with continuous basalt or carbon fiber.

Contact Us

If you would to discuss Anisoprinting, please contact us by calling on 1800 490 514, by filling out the form or clicking the live chat in the bottom right-hand corner.

Contact Us Moving at the Speed of Business

VIEW MORE

3D Printing Non-planar continuous fiber reinforced composites

Anisoprint blog non planar robot Moving at the Speed of Business

3D Printing Non-Planar Continuous Fiber Reinforced Composites

Most 3D printing processes are actually 2.5D but what does that really mean if it is a 3D printer? The conventional process of 3D printing is laying material on top of each other on a parallel plane (usually the print bed), and as layers build, it results in a three-dimensional object.

Planar Vs Non-Planar - Planar Continuous Fiber 3D Printing

In traditional 3D printers, moving parts are most often either the print bed (or table), or the print head, or both of them, such as in the Anisoprint Composer Desktop series of continuous fiber 3D printers. Even though the table and the print head move along the x, y, z axes, the layers are still stacking in the parallel plane, and each subsequent layer is parallel to the previous one.

Anisoprint Composer Planar arrows Moving at the Speed of Business

Planar Vs Non-Planar - Continuous Fiber 3D Printing Limitations

Both FFF (plastic) and continuous fiber 3D printing have a number of limitations. Since the layers are stacked parallel to each other, it is not possible to reinforce parts in two planes at the same time and therefore, the part can only be reinforced in the same plane.

For example, in the parts pictured below, it is not possible to effectively strengthen parts using conventional 3D printers.

Anisoprint non planar blog brackets Moving at the Speed of Business

The second limitation is in the difficulty with printing curved shape models because the extruder is fixed to the XY plane and cannot move out of these planes so that the nozzle remains always perpendicular to the point where the material is laid out.

Anisoprint blog continuous fibers Moving at the Speed of Business

Continuous Fiber Non-Planar 3D Printing

There is a way for ‘’true 3D printing’’ with continuous fibers by using an Anisoprint 6-axis robot that allows reinforcing parts of any shape in different planes.

Anisoprint blog non planar robot Moving at the Speed of Business

The robot includes a 6-axis robot arm and an end-effector printing with continuous fiber. The robot’s axis allow free movement in 6-axis to print complex shapes, without additional supports, molds and tools.

 

Anisoprint blog non planar continuous carbon fiber Moving at the Speed of Business

Design Consulting supplies the complete range of Anisoprint continuous fiber desktop and industrial 3D printer range that provides an open system to print in virtually any plastic material and re-inforce the 3D print with continuous basalt or carbon fiber.

Contact Us

If you would to discuss Anisoprinting, please contact us by calling on 1800 490 514, by filling out the form or clicking the live chat in the bottom right-hand corner.

Contact Us Moving at the Speed of Business

VIEW MORE

Anisoprint Materials

Desktop-anisoprinting
Anisoprint Logo

Materials

With an open printing system, you have the freedom to use any filament. Choose from Anisoprint materials, extended material profiles from Polymaker and eSun or use your own!

Anisoprinting Open System

3D print complex parts with

  • Flexible materials choice

  • Modify the fiber volume ratio

  • Multiple fiber laying trajectories

Anisoprint CFC PA Moving at the Speed of Business

COMBINE

BASE FILAMENT

WITH

CONTINUOUS FIBER

Anisoprint CCF Moving at the Speed of Business

OR

Anisoprint CBF Moving at the Speed of Business
Anisoprint Diagram 2
Anisoprint Diagram

Anisoprint Plastic Filaments

Anisoprint Smooth PA Moving at the Speed of Business
Anisoprint CFC PA Moving at the Speed of Business

SMOOTH PA is 10% carbon fiber reinforced PA12 filament, which provides improved
surface quality, strength and warping. Compared to other polyamide filaments on the
market, Smooth PA features low moisture absorption and anti-warping technology.

CFC PA is a non-filled Polyamide 12 developed by Polymaker for Anisoprint CFC (Continuous Fiber
Co-extrusion) technology. The low viscosity of the plastic ensures better adhesion between the fiber
layers, while the fast cooling and solidification rate helps to achieve better fiber placement.
This low water absorption plastic can be printed without a dryer.

pdf icon
Technical Datasheet
pdf icon
Technical Datasheet

Anisoprint Continuous Fibers

Anisoprint Continuous Carbon Fibre Moving at the Speed of Business
Anisoprint Continuous Basalt Fiber Moving at the Speed of Business

CONTINUOUS CARBON FIBRE + PETG


Effective Diameter (mm)

0.35

Fiber Volume (%)

60

Elastic Modulus (GPa)

150

Tensile Strength (MPa)

2200

Density, g/cm3

1.4

Tensile modulus in fiber direction (GPa)

64

Poisson ratio 21

0.36

Tensile ultimate stress in fiber direction (MPa)

860

Tensile elongation in fiber direction (%)

1.3

Compressive ultimate stress in fiber direction (MPa)

290

Flexural strength (MPa)

520

CONTINUOUS BASALT FIBER + PETG


Effective Diameter (mm)

0.28

Fiber Volume (%)

60

Elastic Modulus (GPa)

54

Tensile Strength (MPa)

1557

Density, g/cm3

1.7

Tensile modulus in fiber direction (GPa)

22

Poisson ratio 21

0.34

Tensile ultimate stress in fiber direction (MPa)

600

Tensile elongation in fiber direction (%)

1.2

Compressive ultimate stress in fiber direction (MPa)

195

Compressive modulus in fiber direction (GPa)

20

pdf icon
Technical Datasheet

eSUN Plastic Filaments

Anisoprint have the following eSun filament profiles in their Aura software:

esun epa Moving at the Speed of Business
esun petg Moving at the Speed of Business

eSUN ePA Nylon

  • Fire retardant (UL94-V2 flame retardant).
  • Printing temp. is 230~260℃.
  • Super strong. 

eSUN PETG

  • Combines the benefits of ABS (stronger, temperature resistant, more durable) and PLA (easy to print) in one material.
  • High mechanical strength and excellent flexibility
  • Excellent layer adhesion.
  • Less warping and shrinkage.
  • 100% recyclable

Printing Parameters:

  • Print temperature: 240~255℃
  • Bed temperature: 80~90℃
  • Printing speed: 30~60mm/s
  • Moving speed: 30~60mm/s
Colours: Clear, Blue, Yellow, Magenta, Solid Red, Green, Orange, Solid Black, Solid White, Solid Silver, Solid Blue, Solid Grey, Solid Gold, Solid Yellow, Solid Green, Solid Purple, Solid Orange, Solid Fire Engine Red, Grey and Purple.

Get In Touch

If you would learn more about Anisoprint, please contact us by calling on 1800 490 514, by filling out the form or clicking the live chat in the bottom right-hand corner.

VIEW MORE

Anisoprint Case Studies

Anisoprint kirsch kersch problem fiber steering composite 3D printing continuous fiber continuous fiber

Anisoprint Case Studies

Choose a case study below to learn more about the part material properties, print times and cost to print.

Wall Bracket

REINFORCEMENT SCHEME

2 COMPOSITE OUTER PERIMETERS, 40% COMPOSITE ISOGRID INFILL

PLASTIC

PETG

FIBER

COMPOSITE CARBON FIBER (CCF)

WEIGHT

25 G

PRINT TIME

6 HOURS

MATERIALS COST, PER CM³

~$0.68 AUD

MATERIALS COST, TOTAL

~$14.00 AUD

Level for Para-Athlete Driver

Para-athlete diver, Dimitry Pavlenko uses Anisoprint parts for an estimated 10x longer lifespan and superior strength.

Dmitry needed a lever to control air inflation and release for maintaining buoyancy and manoeuvrability. Usually, he used a spoon from steel as a lever. It was broken after the 10th dive.

He tried 3D printing and a new lever in ABS was printed, however, became defective also after the 10th dive and unusable.

To increase the lifespan of the part, a new part was designed and printed on an Anisoprint Composer 3D printer from PETG and reinforced with Composite Carbon Fiber.

Anisoprint level para athlete 2 Moving at the Speed of Business
Anisoprint lever para athlete Moving at the Speed of Business
Anisoprint level para athlete 3 Moving at the Speed of Business

Using the Anisoprinted lever, Dimitry made a 40m deep, unassisted dive in open sea and set a new world record.

Anisoprint lever para athlete 4 Moving at the Speed of Business
Anisoprint level para athlete 5 Moving at the Speed of Business
Anisoprint level 8 aura Moving at the Speed of Business

REINFORCEMENT SCHEME

3 COMPOSITE OUTER PERIMETERS, 3 COMPOSITE INNER PERIMETERS

PLASTIC

PETG

FIBER

COMPOSITE CARBON FIBER (CCF)

WEIGHT

32 G

PRINT TIME

3.5 HOURS

MATERIALS COST, PER CM³

~$0.93 AUD

MATERIALS COST, TOTAL

~$21.00 AUD

Electric Wheelchair Fixture

A fixture for an electric wheelchair was anisoprinted in-house 7x lighter, 12x faster and 3x cheaper than the original outsourced part from steel.

Supreme Motors produces UNA Wheel — an electric wheelchair for long distances. The original fixture was made from steel and was too expensive to manufacture it in small batches, with every unit costing over AUD$155.

The turned to 3D printing and found a high-performance plastic, Ultem. The part was 5x lighter, cheaper to make and the most importantly, the company could manufacture the fixtures in-house instead of outsourcing it and spending resources, however, the part 3D printed from Ultem failed stress tests and was not durable enough for application.

Supreme Motors looked for a stronger 3D printing solution and came across anisoprinting. The fixture was made from PETG plastic reinforced with Composite Carbon Fiber (CCF) was printed on an Anisoprint Composer continuous fiber 3D printer.

Anisoprint wheelchair fixture 2 Moving at the Speed of Business
Stress results, left to right: Anisoprinted, Ultem and Steel


Steel

Anisoprint (PETG + CONTINUOUS CARBON FIBRE)

Weight

300g

41g

Production time

48 hours

4 hours

Production stages

3

1

Price

AUD$150

AUD$40

Anisoprint fixture aura Moving at the Speed of Business

Under stress testing, the anisoprint withstood a dynamic load of 117kg, although being 7x lighter and 3x cheaper to produce than the traditional steel part. In addition to being able to print more durable parts, Supreme Motors can produce a part in 4 hours instead of 48 hours.

REINFORCEMENT SCHEME

3 COMPOSITE OUTER PERIMETERS, 3 COMPOSITE INNER PERIMETERS

PLASTIC

PETG

FIBER

COMPOSITE CARBON FIBER (CCF)

WEIGHT

41 G

PRINT TIME

4 HOURS

MATERIALS COST, PER CM³

~$1.27 AUD

MATERIALS COST, TOTAL

~$40.00 AUD

Anisoprint wheelchair fixture 3 Moving at the Speed of Business
Anisoprint wheelchair fixture 4 Moving at the Speed of Business

Self-Sensing Composite for Monitoring Critical Sructures

Brightlands Materials Center, a research center based in Netherlands, has developed 3D printed composite parts with self-sensing functionality using Anisoprint. Self-sensing provides the opportunity to monitor critical structures in aerospace, construction and healthcare industries.

What is Self-Sensing?

Self-sensing is the ability of a material to sense its own condition, whereby the material itself, is used as a sensor. Polymer-matrix composites, containing continuous carbon fiber, are known materials that have self-sensing capabilities based on measurable changes in electrical resistance of the continuous fibers. The practical importance of such products is in structural health monitoring in airplanes or critical parts in construction such as bridges.

Usually, self-sensing material is made with traditional composite manufacturing techniques that are complex and require several-stages and processes made with special equipment.

Brightlands Materials Center is combining the self-sensing of continuous fiber with the fabrication of composites by anisoprinting to make self-sensing more effective.

In their research, the results were discovered by monitoring deformation in a simple bending beam in a scale model of a pedestrian composite bridge.

For sensing it’s crucial to have full freedom that a carbon fiber layout gives because it has to stick out of the part to be able to make connections to the monitoring electronic hardware.

The Anisoprint open system gives the possibility of precise positioning and orientation of carbon fibers. The carbon fibers are placed at chosen locations inside the product that form an integral part of the structure. This means that the carbon fiber “sensors” are located where they are needed, and multiple fibers can form a range of sensors throughout the part.

Anisoprint self sensing 3 Moving at the Speed of Business
Anisoprint self sensing 5 Moving at the Speed of Business
Anisoprint self sensing 4 Moving at the Speed of Business

“As a materials research centre working on continuous fiber additive manufacturing we need flexibility with respect to the materials and fiber layouts that we can use on a 3D printer.

The Anisoprint Composers offer that flexibility enabling us to support our industrial customers to develop innovative fiber reinforced thermoplastic applications”.

– Richard Janssen, Business Developer of Brightlands Materials Center.

REINFORCEMENT SCHEME

2 COMPOSITE OUTER PERIMETERS

PLASTIC

PETG

FIBER

COMPOSITE CARBON FIBER (CCF)

PRINT TIME

35 HOURS

MATERIALS COST, PER CM³

~$1.10 AUD

MATERIALS COST, TOTAL

~$158.00 AUD

Anisoprint Filament Winding Machine Roller

REINFORCEMENT SCHEME

3 COMPOSITE OUTER PERIMETERS, 3 COMPOSITE INNER PERIMETERS

PLASTIC

PETG

FIBER

COMPOSITE CARBON FIBER (CCF)

WEIGHT

41 G

PRINT TIME

4 HOURS

MATERIALS COST, PER CM³

~$1.27 AUD

MATERIALS COST, TOTAL

~$40.00 AUD

Continuous Carbon Fibre Reinforced Soft Jaws

Unique shapes with a 35% weight reduction and 40% lower manufacturing costs.

Operation on a lathe requires special attention to tooling. In cases when parts have complex shapes, thin walls, or are made of soft alloys, standard equipment can damage the surface and leave cracks on it.

Conventional tooling can crumple thin-walled parts because the clamping force is difficult to adjust. Parts such as asymmetrical profiles are very hard to clamp with standard jaws or cams: you either have to spoil and sharpen the cams or waste time and insert a row of liners, then centre the part in the machine.
To solve these problems, WEBER LABS turned to anisoprinting.

Anisoprint Soft Jaws Lathe 2 Moving at the Speed of Business

Weber Labs handles the full cycle of technological part production from model, development, calculations to manufacturing. Quite often these parts are small-scale and non-standard.

The soft-jaws produced need to have a specific purpose, in this case, turning a set of stator plates for an electric motor.

Anisoprint Soft Jaws Lathe 3 Moving at the Speed of Business

Weber Labs highlighted several advantages of Anisoprinted Tooling after testing:

  • Plastics jaws are more flexible than metal ones and when clamped, hold a workpiece more tightly, which helps control the clamping force more precisely and process parts that require careful handling.
  • On older machines, the placement of where the cams fit into wears out, and during operation, the tools leave noticeable traces on apart due to backlash and requires several finishing passes to clean up.
  • Due to its plasticity, soft jaws made from plastic provide better contact, not only minimises the number of finishing passes but also reduces vibration.


CNC METAL

ANISOPRINTING

Weight

600g

251g

Price

AUD$175.00

AUD$70.00

The composite jaws were printed on the Anisoprint Composer 3D printer from Smooth PA plastic reinforced with continuous fibers. Anisoprinted jaws are nearly three times as light as metal ones: 251g vs 600g.

The part is 40% cheaper and 35% lighter, than the metal equivalent. Such cams are less durable and cannot be used for holding large parts, however, this is non-standard tooling. Plastic jaws without reinforcement need to be changed after a few cycles of work, while reinforced 3D printed parts showed durability in more than 15 operation cycles.

Anisoprint Soft Jaws Lathe 4 Moving at the Speed of Business
Anisoprint Soft Jaws Lathe 5 Moving at the Speed of Business
Anisoprint Soft Jaws Lathe 6 Moving at the Speed of Business

Typically, production times for these cams is 29 hours. The outer plastic layer is 1.2mm thick, printed with SMOOTH PA, which is a carbon fiber filled plastic with excellent wear resistance.

REINFORCEMENT SCHEME

5 COMPOSITE OUTER PERIMETERS, 50% COMPOSITE ISOGRID INFILL

PLASTIC

SMOOTH PA

FIBER

COMPOSITE CARBON FIBER (CCF)

WEIGHT

251 G

PRINT TIME

29 HOURS

MATERIALS COST, PER CM³

~$1.55 AUD

MATERIALS COST, TOTAL

~$100.00 AUD

Composite Tool for Turbine Blade Production

8x weight reduction and 40% cost savings.

Shovel machines are used to convert mechanical motion into kinetic energy of a liquid or gas. They are used in impellers, turbines, turbopump units, fans, etc. It’s necessary to change the cross-section, thickness and inclination angle in different zones of the blade for higher efficiency. Metal stamps are traditionally used as tools for producing such blades since they have a complex shape. Different blade shapes require different stamps that in case of metal tools leads to a significant amount of cost and time..

Weight and cost of the tool can be dramatically reduced if it’s produced from composite materials using anisoprinting technology.

Anisoprint turbine blade tool 3 Moving at the Speed of Business

400 BAR PRESSURE

METAL

ANISOPRINTED COMPOSITE (Smooth PA + CBF)

SAVINGS

Weight

600g

251g

87%

Price

AUD$175.00

AUD$70.00

40%

Continuous fiber 3D printing decreases the tool’s weight 8xthat allows using cheaper equipment and operating it easier.

At the same time, there is a 40% cost reduction in comparison to the metal part withstanding the same strength.

Moreover, when printing tools on the Anisoprint Composer continuous composite 3D printer you know the exact date when you get the part without spending any time communicating with 3rd parties you outsource your machined parts to.

Anisoprint turbine blade tool 4 Moving at the Speed of Business



PLASTIC

SMOOTH PA

FIBER

COMPOSITE BASALT FIBER (CCF)

WEIGHT

3500 G

PRINT TIME

340 HOURS

MATERIALS COST, TOTAL

~$955.00 AUD

Composite Rocker for a Downhill Bike

40% reduction in manufacturing costs, 35% reduction in weight with smart load-orientated reinforcement.

Due to extremal operation conditions, downhill bikes should withstand significant loads, and one of the keys to this is a reliable suspension.

Anisoprint Downhill Bike Rocker 3 Moving at the Speed of Business
Downhill bike rocker made from metal using CNC

The rocker is an element in a suspension that obtains flexural loads while riding a bike. It’s often produced from metal by CNC technology (milling) that gives enough strength but is expensive. Continuous fiber 3D printing is a good opportunity to get the part of the same strength but reducing the cost and at th same time, the weight, which in sports, is always a good thing.

The composite rocker was printed on the Anisoprint Composer 3D printer from Smooth PA plastic reinforced with continuous fibers. The part withstands the same loads as metal one, however, is 40% cheaper to make and 35% lighter..

On this kind of bike, the components that could be also manufactured with anisoprinting are the front fork clamp and the pedal crank. Combining a 30% of weight reduction on each of these components, it’s possible to achieve at least a 1000g reduction, depending on the geometry of each part.

Anisoprint Downhill Bike Rocker 4 Moving at the Speed of Business


METAL

ANISOPRINTED COMPOSITE (SMOOTH PA + CBF)

Weight

500g

325g

Price

AUD$590.00

AUD$390.00

One of the most important advantages of anisoprinting is its capability to produce parts with the smart load-oriented reinforcement.

Anisoprint Downhill Bike Rocker 5 Moving at the Speed of Business

The rocker is reinforced in accordance with the expected loads using only the required amount of material. In contrast with milling, you get lots of waste that also has an impact on the overall manufacturing costs.

“One important aspect of using 3D printing in this business is to have the possibility to customize each frame on riders requirement.

It’s quite important because to be cost-competitive even if the frame is hand made, manufacturers need to keep some area of the CF frame standard and then adapt the frame on linear sections. In this way, bike manufacturers would have more flexibility in their bikes.”

— Filippo Pagnani, CEO of Prototipa Design, Italy

REINFORCEMENT SCHEME

10 COMPOSITE PERIMETERS, 80% COMPOSITE ISOGRID INFILL

PLASTIC

SMOOTH PA

FIBER

COMPOSITE CARBON FIBER (CCF)

WEIGHT

325 G

PRINT TIME

100 HOURS

MATERIALS COST, TOTAL

~$390.00 AUD

Clevis for Dairy Production Line

Production downtime reduced from 3 months to 6 hours. 3D Anisoprinted clevis has longer lifespan due to resistance to peroxide hydrogen.

A dairy brand company uses a clevis fixture at the production line. The clevis moves through, catches a yoghurt bottle and sends it to the washing area. The part is washed with peroxide hydrogen. The original part is made from milled polyamide, replacing a destroyed one takes 3 months due to ordering from a third-party. During this time, the production line fully stops: the company doesn’t get enough sales volume and suffers losses.

The part printed on Anisoprint Composer reduced production downtime from 3 months to 6 hours. It was made from PETG, which is resistant to peroxide plastic, and then reinforced with continuous carbon fiber by using anisoprinting technology. Due to the peroxide resistance, the lifespan of  the clevis’ increased.

Anisoprinting technology allows using any plastic as a matrix, so it’s possible to get composites with continuous fibers with the chemical properties you need for the application.

REINFORCEMENT SCHEME

3 COMPOSITE PERIMETERS

PLASTIC

PET G

FIBER

COMPOSITE CARBON FIBER (CCF)

WEIGHT

35.2 G

PRINT TIME

6 HOURS

MATERIALS COST, PER CC

~$1.12 AUD

MATERIALS COST, TOTAL

~$31.00 AUD

Legs for Mobile Robot used for Sensing, Inspection and Remote Operation

By Anisoprinting robotic legs, MSU were able to reduce weight by 70% and lower manufacturing costs by 40%.

In the Institute of Mechanics of MSU a mobile robot —  an analogue of BostonDynamics Spot was developed.

Autonomous operation requires energy which depends on the robot’s weight. Some of the components of the robot can be produced from composites with continuous fibers. It noticeably reduces the weight and allows robot to work longer without charge.

That’s the strategy the developers chose for their robot was to make it more functional.

For this robot as for any other innovative development, it’s very important to have flexibility in terms of design changes. Traditional manufacturing technologies can’t provide the freedom to change a prototype with many iterations without a significant time and money, however, with 3D printing, it can. 

With Anisoprint technology, you can easily set fiber laying paths and infill density in their special slicing software, Aura, to make the part more or less stronger according to results of the field tests.

With the possibility of changing prototypes anytime without spending a significant amount of time and money, the team reduced manufacturing costs by 40% in comparison to milling the part from Aluminium, which requires significantly more effort to redesign a part iteration.

To make the robot work longer, it’s necessary to reduce its weight as much as possible. Using anisoprinting it’s feasible to get the part of the same strength and stiffness characteristics but 70% lighter than the metal analogue.


ALUMINIUM

ANISOPRINTED COMPOSITE (SMOOTH PA + CCF)

SAVINGS

Weight

1225g

350g

70%

Price

AUD$715.00

AUD$400.00

40%

REINFORCEMENT SCHEME

3 OUTER COMPOSITE PERIMETERS, 3 INNER COMPOSITE PERMITERS, 50% COMPOSITE ISOGRID INFILL

PLASTIC

SMOOTH PA

FIBER

COMPOSITE CARBON FIBER (CCF)

WEIGHT

350 G

PRINT TIME

144 HOURS

MATERIALS COST, PER CC

~$3.42 AUD

MATERIALS COST, TOTAL

~$400.00 AUD

Parts with Holes (Kirsch Problem)

This experimental sample with a hole was reinforced without increasing its weight, while maintaining uniform stress distribution.

The fiber steering plate is an experimental demonstration of the method where anisoprinting an efficient reinforcement design of parts with the holes.

Holes are stress concentrators, significantly reducing the strength of structural elements. Traditionally, to increase the strength of an element, a part thickness is enhanced which leads to increasing the weight of the part.

Anisoprint kirsch problem 1 Moving at the Speed of Business

The part can be reinforced by using curvilinear trajectories that suit the load distribution and this type of reinforcement doesn’t require an increase in weight and only possible with a special approach to fiber laying from Anisoprint.



PLASTIC

PET G

FIBER

COMPOSITE CARBON FIBER (CCF)

WEIGHT

50 G

PRINT TIME

7 HOURS

MATERIALS COST, PER CC

~$0.62 AUD

MATERIALS COST, TOTAL

~$26.00 AUD

Aircraft Seat Support

An Airplanes lifetime cost was reduced through a 40% weight reduction of an anisoprinted aircraft seat support

Aircraft seat support bears 1.5 tons of load. The original part is made from aluminum and weighs 400g. We’ve anisoprinted a new part on Composer A4 3D printer with a 40% weight reduction.

With 100 such seat supports in an average single-aisle passenger plane, this weight reduction can add up to saving 25 kg per plane. In such fields as aerospace every kilo matters. Cost of fuel for every kilo in an airplane is $2000 a year and by just reducing the seat support, would save $50,000 a year, per plane.

REINFORCEMENT SCHEME

10 COMPOSITE PERIMETERS

PLASTIC

PETG

FIBER

COMPOSITE CARBON FIBER (CCF)

WEIGHT

250 G

PRINT TIME

40 HOURS

MATERIALS COST, PER CC

~$2.00 AUD

MATERIALS COST, TOTAL

~$412.00 AUD

Contact Us

If you would learn more about Anisoprinting, please contact us by calling on 1800 490 514, by filling out the form or clicking the live chat in the bottom right-hand corner.

VIEW MORE

Anisoprint

Desktop-anisoprinting
Anisoprint Logo

Continuous Fiber 3D Printers

One of the most advanced, fastest and largest continuous fiber 3D printers on the planet

ANISOPRINTING TECHNOLOGY
MANUFACTURING OPTIMAL COMPOSITES THROUGH CONTINUOUS FIBER 3D ANISOPRINTING

With over 10 years experience in composites manufacturing, Anisoprint are the experts in composite material for 3D printing.

If you need to 3D print super-strong parts that rival metal, that are lightweight and need to print fast, look no further than Anisoprint.

With the ability to print any plastic as a matrix, the Anisoprint system lays continuous fiber to make strong, lightweight parts.

Stop thinking metal

Print for

Mass
Scale

prom IS 500 print farm
parts

Models

Choose from Desktop A4/A3 sizes or the Industrial large format ProM for non-stop production.

Desktop

Anisoprint Composer A4 and A3

Composer A4 and A3

Continuous fiber reinforced composites

Anisoprint Composer Desktop comesin 2 models, the A4 and the A3.

A4 Build Volume: 297x210x140mm

A3 Build Volume: 460x297x210mm

System: Open. Providing users with flexible material choice, fiber volume ratio, parts complexity and fiber laying trajectories

Structure: Optimal composite Lattice reinforcement structures for miminum weight, price and production time.

Industrial

Anisoprint Prom IS 500 Industrial composite continuous carbon fiber 3D printer

Prom IS 500

Continuous fiber reinforced composites

High-temp plastics up to 400 degrees celsius such as PEEK and PEI

Large Build Volume: 600x420x300mm

Heated Build Chamber up to 160 degrees celsius 

System: Open. Providing users with flexible material choice, fiber volume ratio, parts complexity and fiber laying trajectories.

Made for 24/7 3D production printing.

Structure: Optimal composite Lattice reinforcement structures for miminum weight, price and production time.

Anisoprint Diagram 2
Anisoprint Diagram

3D Print with Excellent Surface Finishes, Accuracy and Lattice Structures

Materials

With an open printing system, you have the freedom to use any filament. Choose from Anisoprint materials, extended material profiles from Polymaker and eSun or use your own!

Anisoprint Materials

Anisoprint CFC PA Moving at the Speed of Business

COMBINE

BASE FILAMENT

WITH

CONTINUOUS FIBER

Anisoprint CCF Moving at the Speed of Business

OR

Anisoprint CBF Moving at the Speed of Business

Plastic Filaments

Anisoprint Smooth PA Moving at the Speed of Business
Anisoprint CFC PA Moving at the Speed of Business

SMOOTH PA is 10% carbon fiber reinforced PA12 filament, which provides improved
surface quality, strength and warping. Compared to other polyamide filaments on the
market, Smooth PA features low moisture absorption and anti-warping technology.

CFC PA is a non-filled Polyamide 12 developed by Polymaker for Anisoprint CFC (Continuous Fiber
Co-extrusion) technology. The low viscosity of the plastic ensures better adhesion between the fiber
layers, while the fast cooling and solidification rate helps to achieve better fiber placement.
This low water absorption plastic can be printed without a dryer.

pdf icon
Technical Datasheet
pdf icon
Technical Datasheet

Anisoprint has profiles of Anisoprint, generic, Polymaker and eSun filaments. Learn More about the open Anisoprint system, supported filaments and continuous fibers

Aura and Aura Premium Slicing Software

Specially designed software for anisotropic 3D printing to give you the freedom and flexibility to 3D print the most complex structures, lay fibers in the right areas, in the right volumes and direction to achieve the right direction loads and orientations.

Aura 1
  • For FFF and CFC printers
  • Supports STL, STP, OBJ and 3DS files
  • Models saved locally to PC
  • G-code generalisation geometry view
  • Separate settings and combinations for printers, plastics and profiles
  • Layer masks
  • Combination of continuous fiber lattice, linear, concentric and curvlinear fiber orientation
  • Modify the fiber to volume fraction
  • Open system to print any material
  • G-Code export
  • Headless mode
Aura 2
Anisoprint aura software Moving at the Speed of Business

Get In Touch

If you would learn more about Anisoprint, please contact us by calling on 1800 490 514, by filling out the form or clicking the live chat in the bottom right-hand corner.

VIEW MORE